66% less infections when treating femoral neck fractures

technology report online, December 2016

New study proves the advantage of antibiotic bone cements from Heraeus when treating femoral neck fractures. Older patients with comorbidities benefit from locally applied antibiotics.

Helene Berg didn’t have a good day, to put it mildly. The spry pensioner just wanted to make a quick trip to the pharmacy to pick up her blood pressure tablets. But one unfortunate misstep on the stairs – and now she is lying in the hospital with a femoral neck fracture. She needs to have a hip joint prosthese implanted. And even though this operation has become a routine procedure, it is associated with certain risks such as bacterial infection.

The antibiotic bone cement developed by Heraeus Medical, contains antibiotics that protect against a broad spectrum of pathogens typically associated with prosthetic infections.

In the fight against implant-associated infections in orthopedics and trauma surgery, antibiotic-loaded bone cements from Heraeus act as a local carrier of active ingredients to prevent these infections. The bone cements are used to anchor joint prostheses to bone. The targeted application of antibiotics often spares patients the burden of an additional surgery. This reduces the risk of often protracted complications, which in turn is beneficial in health and socioeconomic aspects.

A current randomized study from Great Britain entitled “The use of high-dose dual-impregnated antibiotic-laden cement with hemiarthroplasty for the treatment of a fracture of the hip – The fractured hip infection trial” (November 2016) provides evidence of this. Here the use of dual-impregnated antibiotic bone cement (COPAL® G+C from Heraeus) in primary hemiarthroplasty to treat a femoral neck fracture significantly reduces the risk of infection by 66% compared to a cement containing only one antibiotic. COPAL® G+C, the antibiotic loaded bone cement developed by Heraeus Medical, contains antibiotics that protect against a broad spectrum of pathogens typically associated with prosthetic infections.

High dose, dual antibiotic-impregnated cement reduces surgical site infection in hip hemiarthroplasty

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